Energy Efficient Homes
        The ideal energy efficient building retains the best environment for living while minimizing the consumption and waste of energy. © Crook 2006                The biggest source of clean cheap energy is energy not used. R. Muller, Foreign Policy, Nov 2008                If you don’t understand energy efficient technology it’s probably because it’s based on principles of thermodynamics, physics, and rocket science. © Crook 2010                When you install an alternative energy system without first reducing your building’s demand for energy you ‘re still wasting energy and foregoing comfort--You've put the cart before the horse. © Crook 2011                An energy efficient building is always "Green" but a green buildings isn't always energy efficient. © Crook 2009                "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction", Sir Isaac Newton's "Action-Reaction Law", 1687                The transfer of heat between objects can never be stopped: it can only be slowed down. © Crook 2008                It's always easier to get into something than it is to get out.                Clean coal refers to coal with less particulants/pollutants. Clean coal when burned, unless SEQUESTRATED spews CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) into the atmosphere causing pollution. What does "clean coal" and "pork the other white meat have in common? Both are half-truths and both have the propensity to make you sick.        

When buying a new home make sure it’s energy efficient


Posted 06/04/2011 by Siti Crook

Do you hope to buy a new home someday, or move into your dream home next?  If you do I strongly urge you to thoroughly investigate the energy demand of the house you’re planning to buy before signing on the dotted line.

If you’re already the type of person that researches a product before purchasing it, the same diligence should be conducted when purchasing a home, new or existing. Otherwise, chances are you could purchase someone’s “lip stick job”—fancy countertops, elaborate floor covering, etc.  only to find that once you’ve moved in  there’s no substance to your home’s structure.

For example, the heat outside can conduct (penetrate) through the walls into your home forcing your air conditioner to work harder.   If it’s cold outside the heat in the conditioned air inside your home can conduct (penetrate) out through the walls making your heater work harder.

Recently, when I was surfing the internet looking for like minded people interested in energy efficiency technology, I came across an enraged homebuyer turned blogger.  Apparently, the blogger had purchased a new home advertised as energy efficient but it wasn’t, so they created a website/ blog to warn others about the builder.  I suspect they hadn’t done their due diligence before they bought the house and they were probably also angry with themselves. Their experience doesn’t need to be yours. 

When you buy a home it is generally the largest single purchase most people make, and as far as I know there aren’t any returns.

House Lemon Law

Since it’s not possible to return your home if you don’t like it, there are groups of people wanting to legislate a “House Lemon Law”.  However, with any law it is usually a remedy after the fact when the damage has already occurred.  Prevention is much more effective and definitely less costly.

As you move towards making your purchase decision, be mindful that one day your utility bills could equal or surpass your monthly mortgage payment.  It’s already happening to some homeowners. They owe two mortgages—one to the bank and one to the utility company.  

Ask to see the present owner’s utility bills.  If they won’t produce the utility bills keep looking, or if you really like the house, have a third party audit performed by a certified BPI or HERs auditor.   The same is true for a newly constructed home.  If the house doesn’t have an independent third party evaluation already,  insist on having one done.

Hind sight is always 20/20, and you probably won’t win if you bet that energy costs will go down. Historically, energy costs have increased by two to two and a half percent a year for the past 50 years.  I doubt you’ll regret making the time to prevent what could very possibly be a costly and preventable mistake.



2

2 Responses to “When buying a new home make sure it’s energy efficient”

  1. Frenchie Says:

    To think, I was confused a minute ago.

  2. buy oem Microsoft Office Visio Professional 2007 software Says:

    I want to say thank to the blogger very much not only for this post but also for his all preceding efforts. .

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.



Go To Top ↑